The Truth About Teeth Dehydration

Our bodies are made up of about 65% water, so it’s crucial for our organs and skin to maintain that hydration.

What some people don’t realise is that teeth can become dehydrated, too. Even if we drink two litres of water a day, it doesn’t guarantee tooth hydration. 

Why do our teeth get dehydrated, anyway?

As strange as it sounds, with a mouth full of saliva production our teeth can dry out. It’s often because of outside factors such as medications or even sleeping with your mouth open. Ever heard the phrase ‘My mouth’s as dry as the Sahara desert’?  If your tongue feels dry, your teeth might also be dry. Sinus infections and even excessive consumption of salt can dry out your mouth.  Some over the counter whitening treatments can produce a lovely glow but it’s actually caused by the dehydration of your teeth, which over time isn’t good for your health or your teeth.

Why is dehydration harmful for teeth?

First of all, when the teeth are dehydrated, most probably the gums and tongue are, too. This can cause bad breath and ideal breeding conditions for various nasty oral bacteria. Our saliva helps protect our teeth and mouth against bacteria and washes away mutants which otherwise would directly cause cavities and attack our teeth’s enamel. Bad bacteria in the mouth causes many problems for health.  Have you ever noticed white spots on teeth? Well, these resemble decalcification spots.  Luckily, when teeth are rehydrated they disappear, but not before temporary discomfort and embarrassment.

How to keep your mouth hydrated?Plenty of water is essential for your teeth, mind and body. But if water doesn’t seem to be enough, speak to your dentist today at The Mall Stockport to discuss a moisturizing mouthwash and take a closer look at what could be causing the problem.