Dental Benefits of Phasing Out a Sugar Addiction

37% of British people are likely to reply ‘Yes’ when asked if they would like sugar in their tea and when asked ‘How much?’, the amount is quite shocking.

London Smile Care conducted a study stating that a whopping 32% of Brits like between 1 – 2 spoons of sugar in their cuppa.  However, an even greater 1 in 20 people admitted to having between 3 – 4 spoons. A single spoonful of sugar may seem harmless in a cup of tea, but eventually they all add up and the health effects are not good.

The UK has one of the highest sugar consumption rates in Europe and the impact this is having, not only on our oral health, but our health in general, is not sweet. Sugar is the main cause of tooth decay and UK dentists and hospitals are currently extracting thousands of rotting and decayed teeth every year.

Sugar is very well known for the damaging effects that it brings to your teeth and oral health, as a majority of foods and drinks people consume have a very high sugar count. In moderation, sugar is great – but having too much of it can create some very damaging, long-lasting effects. Monitoring your sugar intake can be a way to limit the negative ways that sugar can harm your oral health. Cutting down and phasing out sugar in your diet doesn’t only benefit your oral health, but also your physical health. Sugar is known to be closely linked to weight gain, liver failure and diabetes. Limiting your sugar consumption has been proven to improve mental health, oral health and physical health. 

You should be very meticulous with your oral care especially if your diet consists of a large amount of sugar. By brushing twice daily and rinsing out the mouth after having some sweets or a fizzy drink, you could slightly limit the damaging effects that sugar can cause to the teeth. Using a fluoride toothpaste also helps with protecting your teeth and dental health.  Nonetheless, it is well worth thinking about the wider impact on your health if you consume too much of the sweet stuff!